Come Support the Fleet!

Survival Suit racers jump in Salmon Bay at Fishermen’s Terminal. Photo courtesy of: FishermensFallFestival.org

Saturday, September 23rd is the Fisherman’s Fall Festival! Doors open at 11 am and continues until 6 pm, staffed by over 200 volunteers. Entrance is free and open to the public, and the entire event is family-oriented. The festival celebrates the return of the North Pacific fishing fleet to the terminal, and all benefits go to support the Seattle Fishermen’s Memorial Foundation, providing support for families who have lost their loved ones at sea. Donations are greatly appreciated.

A model boat sits near real ones at the 2016 Fishermen’s Fall Festival.  Photo: Alethea Myers

Did you know that Seattle has the largest commercial fishing fleet in the world? And this festival is all about the fishing and the seafood. There’s a great variety of activities to choose from: seafood demos, vigorous contests (lutefisk eating, oyster slurping, salmon filleting) and the exciting survival suit races. The safety gear used in these races are what’s featured on “The Deadliest Catch”.

There are craft and educational opportunities here for both kids and adults as well. The Reptile Man will be here again this year. And the live music provided covers a wide gamut from taiko drumming, rock ‘n roll, sea shanties, to country music. There’s also a comedy performance and plenty of seafood to eat, including a salmon BBQ. Brush up on your seafood and fishing trivia for a chance to win great prizes from local merchants, too.

Where the event is held at Fishermen’s Terminal.  Photo: Joe Mabel

Come support our fleet families!

For Sale: Fort Lawton

Exterior of one of the Fort Lawton buildings.  Photo: Fort Lawton Homes

If you’ve ever frequented historic Fort Lawton, located within the 534 acres of Discovery Park, one can imagine how it must have felt to live there over 100 years ago when the army base served as an outpost to protect Seattle from outside naval threat. And second, ironically, to protect Seattle from itself: by curbing rampant lawlessness in newly-formed Seattle.

Panoramic aerial views of Fort Lawton.  Photos: Fort Lawton Homes

The panoramic views are still incredible today, and the beautiful old homes, which are registered as national landmarks, have been fully renovated inside while retaining the character of the original build: the original windows, woodwork, fireplaces, and often a roomy three stories + a basement. As many Magnolia natives know, Fort Lawton is also very convenient to the downtown Seattle core: only 15-30 minutes away.

Historic photo of Fort Lawton and soldiers.  Photo: Museum of History & Industry. All rights reserved.   Neg# SHS7164

In 2011, the last military presence occupying the site, the Army Reserve, relocated to Marysville, WA. The U.S. Navy personnel who were then living in the dwellings were moved. And the historic residences, built in 1900, went on sale in 2015. Many people have applied to buy these 26 homes: well over 2,000 people, in fact. As of this writing, the somewhat smaller homes located along Montana Circle and the larger Officers’ Row homes have all sold with the exception of two: 4002 & 4216 Washington Ave. W. (plus an additional one pending). The remaining two are priced at $1.79 million and $1.975 million.

Fort Lawton, in the course of its long history, has seen many things. 20,000 U.S. soldiers were processed through, whether embarking or returning from four different wars. It held German and Italians prisoners of war during World War II. A riot against Italian prisoners’ privileges erupted, resulting in a murder and numerous injuries. African-American soldiers were accused of the murder on shaky grounds, and years later the army publicly apologized for these soldiers’ imprisonment, reinstating honorable discharges, and provided back pay to their families. Native Americans protested their rights to the land and encamped at the site when the surplus land was decommissioned in 1970, which resulted in the formation of the Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center. A fire broke out in one of the buildings being renovated only a year ago. And our city’s largest park (and most pristine in this writer’s humble opinion), Discovery Park, began when the military gave the rest of the surplus land to the city.

Interior of Fort Lawton home.  Photo: Fort Lawton Homes

Many of Fort Lawton’s Colonial Revival buildings have withstood the test of time. And now you can tour the restored homes, in-person (at least for the moment), or vicariously peruse the photos below.

Photos and video of the Fort Lawton homes:
http://ownfortlawton.com

http://seattlerefined.com/the-home/the-most-unique-new-neighborhood-in-seattle

https://seattle.curbed.com/2016/9/16/12938138/fort-lawton-officers-row-homes-4002-washington

The Market’s Opening Soon!

The seasonal Magnolia Farmers Market will be opening on June 3rd!  Because of our unusually long rainy season this year in WA State (the longest on record in modern history), some of the farm vendors understandably had a delay with their crops. But our warm season is firmly underway now, as are abundant produce, herbs, and artisanal goods!

Recently, Seattle was rated 4th in the nation for being the most fit city. One of the reasons cited for this improvement was the increase in the number of farmers markets in our area: a positive indication that unprocessed, natural food can make a difference in one’s health.

If you would like to visit other farmers markets in other neighborhoods as well, here is a complete list of places and hours from The Seattle Times. The Magnolia Farmers Market will be on Saturdays, from 10 am-2 pm through October 14thth (except July 29th) . Bon appetit!